Lonesome Dove

Review of: Lonesome Dove

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On 17.11.2019
Last modified:17.11.2019

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In letzter Sekunde Pflicht. LiveTV Streaming entsteht eine Szene. Inzwischen wurden 21 Lndern dieser Irre Szene 14: Mika, dass sie Tele 5, im Internet nur.

Lonesome Dove

Über Filme auf DVD bei Thalia ✓»Weg in die Wildnis - Lonesome Dove [​2 DVDs]«und weitere DVD Filme jetzt online bestellen! Lonesome Dove ist eine amerikanische epische Western-Adventure-Miniserie unter der Regie von Simon Wincer. Es ist eine vierteilige Adaption des gleichnamigen Romans von von Larry McMurtry und die erste Folge der Lonesome Dove-Reihe. Find Wildes Land - Return to Lonesome Dove - Teil (Fernsehjuwelen) at apicella.eu Movies & TV, home of thousands of titles on DVD and Blu-ray.

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Lonesome Dove ist eine amerikanische epische Western-Adventure-Miniserie unter der Regie von Simon Wincer. Es ist eine vierteilige Adaption des gleichnamigen Romans von von Larry McMurtry und die erste Folge der Lonesome Dove-Reihe. Weg in die Wildnis (englischer Originaltitel: Lonesome Dove) ist ein erschienener Roman von Larry McMurtry, der mit dem Pulitzer-Preis. Lonesome Dove | McMurtry, Larry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Lonesome Dove | McMurtry, Larry, McMurtry, Larry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Find Wildes Land - Return to Lonesome Dove - Teil (Fernsehjuwelen) at apicella.eu Movies & TV, home of thousands of titles on DVD and Blu-ray. apicella.eu: Weg in die Wildnis - Lonesome Dove: Movies & TV. Über Filme auf DVD bei Thalia ✓»Weg in die Wildnis - Lonesome Dove [​2 DVDs]«und weitere DVD Filme jetzt online bestellen!

Lonesome Dove

Lonesome Dove | McMurtry, Larry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Lonesome Dove ist eine amerikanische epische Western-Adventure-Miniserie unter der Regie von Simon Wincer. Es ist eine vierteilige Adaption des gleichnamigen Romans von von Larry McMurtry und die erste Folge der Lonesome Dove-Reihe. Lonesome Dove Knoxville, Knoxville. Gefällt Mal. Lonesome Dove Knoxville is Chef Tim Love's flagship, brought to life in Old City with added local. Lonesome Dove

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Needless to say, a very satisfying character study. The Atmosphere — You want to feel like you are in the Old West. Read this book. Summary — I am sure by now you can tell this book blew me away.

I would highly recommend it, but it may not be for everyone. If you are not a fan of Epics, it is probably not for you. If you have a hard time with real, raw, and often not pretty scenes in books, this also may not be for you not quite as bad as Cormac McCarthy in Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West , but still pretty intense!

If you are fans of books like Gone with the Wind by Mitchell or Centennial by Michener and you have not read this book, you must!

You really, really, really must read this book! View all 83 comments. This is one of my favoritest books ever.

It has the bonus of not only being an incredible book but also having an excellent companion piece in the television mini-series based on it that is one of the great all-time fusions of print and film.

It only managed to take best director and a few other technical prizes. Worse yet, none of the actors nominated won. Hey, Emmy voters of ! Why do I say the story is perfect?

Start with the characters. Gus also delights in giving Call grief about young Newt, a boy they took in after the death of his mother.

Their dull routine is broken when their old friend and fellow ex-Ranger Jake Spoon shows up. Jake, who is another candidate to be Newt's dad, is looking for a hiding place after accidentally shooting a man in Arkansas, and he fears that the sheriff, July Johnson, will be after him.

He wants to be the first to drive a herd to the Montana territory and start a ranch there. Call soon has started hiring men and stealing Mexican cattle for the drive.

Gus says that Call is going to get them all killed just to have another adventure in a wild frontier, but he goes along to see his old sweetheart Clara who is living in Nebraska.

This book has everything that anyone could want in a story. And all of this is set during those last moments when America was still half-wild and anyone with the gumption to do so could throw together a herd of cattle and go out into the wilderness to make history or lose their scalp.

View all 55 comments. This was such a surprisingly wonderful read, well beyond the traditional stereotypes of westerns with realistic, lovable and hateful characters and an incredible scenario.

I am not sure how to present my review of this page masterpiece. Perhaps we start with the town of Lonesome Dove itself. It is a small settlement next to the Mexican border.

There is the Hat Creek crew with their horses a collection of which is a remuda and cattle. In charge of the crew are Captain Woodrow Call and Cap This was such a surprisingly wonderful read, well beyond the traditional stereotypes of westerns with realistic, lovable and hateful characters and an incredible scenario.

They are longtime friends and former Texas Rangers one whose squad was also the somewhat dim hand Pea Eye Parker and the Mexican cook Bolivar.

There is a younger man Newt that was adopted by the crew after his mother, a local prostitute named Maggie passed away I believe her story is told in Comanche Moon.

There are a few other ranches around and the downtown is just a handful of shops and the local saloon, the Dry Bean which is also the local whorehouse both owned and run by Frenchman Xavier Wanz.

In the whorehouse, Lorena Wood is a rather silent prostitute living at the Dry Bean with a sad, long backstory that landed her in Lonesome Dove.

Augustus is one of her kinder and more generous customers. Lippy, who has a droopy lip and a hole in his stomach, plays the "pian-er" and serves as comic relief in the bar.

Into this picture, Dishwater Boggett, a local cowhand, rides in and falls head over heels with Lorena, who barely notices his existence.

But the entire plot is set into inexorable motion with the arrival of former Ranger and colleage of Call and Gus, Jake Spoon - gambler, lady's man, and alcoholic.

Naturally, Lorena immediately falls head over heels in love with him, giving up on the "sporting life. The idea being to "open" and "settle" the land there with a few thousand head of cattle these will be stolen from Mexico by the crew.

This idea, initially panned by Gus, is, for somewhat inexplicable reasons at first, picked up by Call and becomes an obsession. He decides to make the drive and thus the story begins in earnest.

Since the rest of the book is the trek from Texas to Montana, we need to add to this picture a few other important characters: - July Johnson - a sheriff in Fort Smith, Arkansas whose brother was mistakenly killed by Jake Spoon, thus explaining his presence, somewhat clandestine, in Texas.

He is married to Elmira who is unbeknownst to him a former prostitute still in love with her last pimp, Dee Boot. He has a deputee Roscoe Brown and a son named Joe.

At the beginning of Part 2 Part 1 being dedicated to the organization and start of the cattle drive , July and Joe set out to capture Jake Spoon and bring him to justice and Roscoe is tasked with "watching" Elmira who takes off on a whiskey boat to find her beau, Dee.

She has two daughers, Sally and Betsey and a dying husband, Bill. She is strong-willed, quick-tongued and excellent with horses. He kills and rapes with no remorse and is a formidable antagonist for Gus and his capture of Lorena is a key pivot in the plot.

The thing that strikes the reader is how the book avoids stereotypes. Despite having played a major role in destroying the place of Indians in the West and reducing the survivors to either crime or starvation as we see repeatedly in the book , Gus realizes this and questions which side was truly in their rights, who really belonged on the land and sees the mechanics of how the scheme worked.

Here is Gus about settling the West: "Why, women and children and settlers are just cannon fodder for lawyers and bankers," Augustus said. After the Indians wipe out enough of them, you get your public outcry, and we go chouse the Indians out of the way.

If they keep coming back then the Army takes over and chouses them worse. Finally the Army will manage the whip 'em down to where they can be squeezed onto some reservation, so the lawyers and bankers can come in and get civilisation started.

Every bank in Texas ought to pay us a commission for the work we done. If we hadn't done it, all the bankers would still be back in Georgia, living on poke salad and turnip greens.

Just look at it from a nature standpoint. If you've got enough snakes around the place, you won't be overrun with rats and varmints.

The way I see it, the Indians and the bandits have the same job to do. Let them be and you won't constantly be having to ride around these dern settlements.

I think we spent our best years fighting on the wrong side. He even lost the sense that he was a cowboy, the strongest sense he had to work with.

He was just a fellow with a glass in his hand, who life had suddenly turned to mud. During the drive, they are hit by misfortunes of Biblical proportions: one is killed after stepping in a nest of snakes in a river, another having been struck by lightning, the crew is hit with sandstorms, locust storms, and hail storms.

At one point, the surly Bolivar quits the company and they hire Po Campo later on to replace him. This is a good moment to point out the many moments of humor in the book - the rivalry between Gus and Po as the team's primary sources of entertainment was a great on-going joke.

Po Campo is a Mexican character who walks beside the wagon all the way north being the closest to nature of all of them.

In the narrative, the drive continues, the destinies of Roscoe and Joe and Elmira play out against a background of the drive making it across to Montana with wonderful descriptions the great west, technical explanations of the various aspects of cattle drives, and of course just great storytelling.

I hope this review encouraged you to pick up and read this classic if you never had, or to reread it if you have.

I was moved by the depth of the characters, the refusal of McMurtry to water down the violence or succumb to empty stereotypes or a Hollywood ending.

While being faithful to aspects of the classic western, McMurtry surpassed the genre to create a real masterpiece of American literature that is enduring and beautiful.

I am watching the TV series again with my kids 10 and 13 and we all nearly cried at the end of the first episode. Just wish we had seen the rancher that Gus had that hilarious exchange about renting pigs with.

Definitely worth seeking out the TV show. One of the rare adaptations to the small screen that came close to the perfection of the book.

This first episode ends with the cattle drive over the Nueces River and the first tragedy of many along the route.

The second episode deals a lot with Blue Duck, Gus and Lorrie. I think they could have cast someone a bit more Heath Ledger-ish as Blue Duck as well as for Monkey John and Ermoke because the characters in the book were far more wicked and well-drawn.

Episode two draws to a close as Gus comfort Lorrie. We also finally meet Clara in Ogalalla. The last episode deals with, well, the end of the book and is full of beauty in Montana as well as the death of some important characters for whom my entire family was in tears.

It did not vary much from the book other than skipping the epic bull-grizzly fight and giving a slightly different final scene. Overall, it was an extraordinary TV show and was nearly a perfect reflection of the book.

Duvall and Lee Jones are absolutely splendid and there are more great lines here than in the last 7 Star Wars movies combined. View all 34 comments.

Jun 17, Elyse Walters rated it it was amazing. Pulitzer Prize winner: It turned out to be so darn good I was crushed when it was over.

I recently learned another season will be returning. I just finished the first Pulitzer Prize winner: I just finished the first two seasons.

I am thankful for the time spent inside this masterpiece. I can now understand why this book left a mark on the world! Special thanks to Lloyd, Alli, and Cheri View all 79 comments.

Shelves: i-said , to-the-island , lets-get-real , prize-winners , top , killer-prose. Hands Down my Favourite Book in First of all the physical; the book I see looking up at me from my coffee table.

It looks worn, well thumbed, well read, pages and cover alike, beginning to curl up, and soiled by use.

Well that and all the casual I take books with me acquaintances, to the one, they all had to pick it up, look it over.

It may look well rode, but it still feels soft, warm and pliant in my hand. I long to go back……. When Augustus came out on the porch the blue pigs were eating a rattlesnake — not a very big one.

It had probably just been crawling around looking for shade when it ran into the pigs. They were having a fine tug-of-war with it, and its rattling days were over.

The sow had it by the neck and the shoat by the tail. Pigs on the porch just made things hotter and things were already hot enough.

He stepped down into the dusty yard and walked around to the springhouse to get his jug. The sun was still high, sulled in the sky like a mule, but Augustus had a keen eye for sun, and to his eye the long light from the west had taken on an encouraging slant.

And so it begins. I have read a number of different reviews; many of which discuss how long it took for them to get invested in the story.

It has been quite a journey. Make no mistake; I spent time with all of the Hat Creek Cattle Company, not just the ex-rangers, as they drove their herd out of Texas and across the Great Plains, bound for Montana.

I pined with Dish, listened to the Irish sing, and the remuda nicker and whinny. I ate dust with Newt on the heels of the herd and scouted for water and crossings with Deets.

I was there for the water moccasins, the grizzlies and the cloud of grasshoppers, not to mention Blue Duck, one of the most frightening, sinister men ever ; he made the hair on the back of my neck, my arms and everywhere else stand, stock still at attention.

I am just skimming the surface here, there are others with tales to tell, like July Johnson, the painfully shy sheriff from Arkansas, searching for his wife and Clara, the dark haired beauty with the scorching tongue in Nebraska, who may just sear you with her words.

But back at the fire I would curl up and listen to Gus talk, reassured by his very presence, as we have a drink, play a hand or two and prepare to bed down.

Amid all the words, in all the books, on all of the pages I have ever travelled, never before have I met a man so damn finely crafted, so carefully rendered, so agonizingly authentic as Augustus McCrae.

It is as though I know him for real. I enjoy his company and even now, miss his conversation. Yes, I want to go back………..

I god, folks, seriously, what is happening here? I do not read westerns. Fact is, were I not a member of this wonderful on line community of book lovers, chances are pretty good that I would never have read this book.

Do not make that mistake and yes, I Thank You one and all! View all 89 comments. I approached Lonesome Dove with some trepidation.

Investing a few weeks could have been risky The plot is full of incident and high excitement, the human stories are emotionally gripping and there is a lovely, wry humour throughout.

The book is also surprisingly brutal in places. Life is often I approached Lonesome Dove with some trepidation.

Most of the book concerns a cattle drive, a great, messy, lumbering affair that acts as a backdrop to the lives and loves of the characters. As the outfit navigate their way across thousands of inhospitable miles without gps or weather forecasts, they are under constant threat from Indians, bandits and ill health - doctors are extremely rare.

There are many white knuckle adventures along the way and survival is random and unpredictable. The savage, untamed landscape also drives much of the story, as the ramshackle group traverse vast prairies, deserts and mesquite covered scrubland - through dust storms, droughts, monsoon like rain, snow and plagues of crickets.

What most lingers in the memory though, are the people and their stories, the every day dramas and dreams of the Hat Creek outfit.

Their strengths and failings, wisdom and fears, become important to the reader. Like old friends I felt real affection for them An illusion or cliche certainly, but as the last lurid sunset colours the prairie and I close the book for the last time, I can definitely still hear their voices.

Lonesome Dove is an immense and wonderfully sustained piece of writing View all 87 comments. Richard Lesle wrote: "Really honest review of such an outstanding novel.

Thanks Richard. My all-time favorite read. The only book that I have ever read that th Lesle wrote: "Really honest review of such an outstanding novel.

The only book that I have ever read that the characters feel like friends while readng and they tend t Cheri Wonderful review for an epic novel, Richard.

I read this one probably sometime last year, as well, with a great deal of hesitation as well. But it was Wonderful review for an epic novel, Richard.

But it wasn't that long before I never wanted to leave these pages. This is a book I first read twenty-five years ago. The heart does not translate well to the page.

Maybe the most difficult thing in discussing Lonesome Dove is conveying how a novel about a cattle drive — the subject of countless B-westerns — can mean so much.

This is not just an instance of an author taking genre material and doing it really well. If that makes any sense. On one level, this is a familiar novel.

All the touchstones of a cowboy western are present. There are nighttime raids into Mexico, and Indian fights, and outlaw gangs.

On the trail, the men of the Hat Creek Cattle Company have to contend with ornery cattle, wild rivers, and sudden storms, not to mention a fearsome desperado named Blue Duck.

All that, however, is only incident to the central storyline: the platonic love story of two men. It is their co-dependent some would argue destructive relationship that drives the plot and gives Lonesome Dove its sometimes staggering power.

It is worth noting that McMurtry adapted the screenplay for Brokeback Mountain , a less platonic love story between two cowboys.

When the novel opens, they are running a middling cattle company in the border town of Lonesome Dove, Texas.

We begin with Gus McCrae, making biscuits for breakfast: It was tribute enough to sunup that it could make even chaparral bushes look beautiful, Augustus thought, and he watched the process happily, knowing it would only last a few minutes.

The sun spread reddish-gold light through the shining bushes, among which a few goats wandered, bleating. Even when the sun rose above the low bluffs to the south, a layer of light lingered for a bit at the level of the chaparral, as if independent of its source.

Then the sun lifted clear, like an immense coin. The dew quickly died, and the light that filled the bushes like red dust dispersed, leaving clear, slightly bluish air.

Which is an utterly classical way to open a novel. This is Jake Spoon, a garrulous, fun-loving man who likes to drink, gamble, and make love.

In tone, Lonesome Dove is elegiacal. It is set in the late s, sometime after the death of Custer, but before the final slaughter of Wounded Knee. The west is still wild, but the writing is on the wall.

Civilization will out. An end of an era is coming. Augustus and Woodrow recognize this. They are aging themselves, and much of the time, McMurtry is taking his story in two directions.

While his characters physically move towards Montana, they are also traveling back in time, to the choices they made as younger versions of themselves.

Lonesome Dove is driven as much by character as plot. The plot itself is wide-ranging, with several disconnected storylines gradually merging into climatic moments.

Woodrow Call is the emotionally constipated leader, a hard, rigid man with a strict code of honor, who hates rude behavior and cannot tolerate weakness — especially his own.

The Hat Creek Cattle crew is also joined by a former piano player, a couple of stray Irishmen, and some intrepid pigs.

This is a masculine world, but there are a couple major female roles. The first belongs to Lorena, a prostitute in Lonesome Dove who accompanies the cattle drive to Montana.

At first blush, she seems a tired type, the whore with a heart of gold. She does not always have control of events, yet she maintains her agency.

She knows what she wants and does not want and acts accordingly. She is a character worthy of Gus in every way, and is one of the few people who can steal a scene back from him.

She is blunt and brash and caught in the tangled webs of the past, like everyone else. Her native sense makes her a bit of a Greek chorus, commenting on Gus and Woodrow and the consequences of their relationship.

The amazing thing about all these characters, even the walk-ons, is that they feel real. They have depth.

They do not always make the right choices. They do not always do the right things. They can be stubborn.

They can be prickly. They are not always likeable. Frequently, they can be downright frustrating. There are exceptions.

Some of the characters are absurdities, because McMurtry has a bit of an eye for oddballs. Towering over them all is Augustus McCrae. He is, I am confident in saying, one of the best characters in the history of American letters.

He is a raconteur, the man who always has something to say about everything. He is both hard-bitten and starry-eyed; a pragmatist and a romantic.

And he is filled with wisdom. The healthy way is to learn to like the everyday things, like soft beds and buttermilk—and feisty gentlemen.

None of us is such fine judges of what to do. A man that likes to rent pigs won't be stopped. Nevertheless, they have real affection for each other, even though, as Clara notes, they might have been better off missing each other completely.

Lonesome Dove perfectly balances its tone. It is, at times, a realistic western with a mythical overlay. In other moments, though, it is pure myth, proudly brimming with archetypal tropes.

The world of Lonesome Dove can be violent and grim and dark. It can be nostalgic. It can be funny and sly. It can be farcical. It can be plaintive and mournful.

There is a hint or two of magical realism. As with many of the great epics, it refuses to be pegged as one thing; instead, it is all these things, like the world is all these things.

My paperback version is nearly pages long, and with that kind of heft, you might expect McMurtry to say something profound about the complex arc of our national history.

Instead, he centers his insights on people. Specifically, we are here to learn how to live from Augustus McCrae. View all 14 comments.

My introduction to the fiction of Larry McMurtry is Lonesome Dove , consistently ranked as one of the best westerns whether the conversation is print or television.

Published the year of the Texas Sesquicentennial in and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction the following year, the magnum opus is a magnificent exploration of male friendship, with a dozen supporting characters of both genders who McMurtry could've dedicated a novella to and often attempts to over pages.

The bantering My introduction to the fiction of Larry McMurtry is Lonesome Dove , consistently ranked as one of the best westerns whether the conversation is print or television.

The bantering becomes a beast of its own and the story padding crosses over into self-indulgence, but there's no question that there's a masterful novel in here.

Somewhere along the border of Texas and Mexico in the late s lies the town of Lonesome Dove, which consists of little more than a dry saloon and a livery stable.

A two-time widower and a bachelor, respectively, the men lead Joshua Deets a black scout from their rangering days , Peaeye Parker an ex-ranger who is loyal but none too bright , Newt Dobbs the seventeen year old progeny of a prostitute and in all likelihood, Call and Bolivar an ill-tempered cook who enjoys clanging the dinner bell with a crowbar.

Having dedicated their prime to eliminating the threat of Comanche Indians or Mexican bandits to Texas, Gus and Call have spent nine years operating the Hat Creek Cattle Company, stabling horses, stealing fresh ones south of the border for sale and little else.

When he's not drinking whiskey on the porch or jawing, Augustus visits the Dry Bean for a card game or a poke with the town's sporting lady, a cool blonde named Lorena Wood who dreams of traveling to San Francisco, but needs a dependable man to get her there.

Call, whose favorite pastime is sitting at the river crossing after dinner hoping he might catch a horse thief, hungers for a challenge.

Call was not a man to daydream--that was Gus's department--but then it wasn't really daydreaming he did, alone on the little bluff at night.

It was just thinking back to the years when a man who presumed to stake out a Comanche trail would do well to keep his rifle cocked. Yet the fact that he had taken to thinking back annoyed him, too: he didn't want to start working over his memories, like an old man.

Sometimes he would force himself to get up and walk two or three more miles up the river and back, just to get the memories out of his head.

Not until he felt alert again--felt that he could still captain if the need arose--would he return to Lonesome Dove.

The next morning, Deets returns from San Antonio with Jake Spoon, a comrade from their rangering days whose love for ladies and aversion to work has led him to a career as a gambler.

Jake had overstayed his welcome in Fort Smith, Arkansas when an argument with a mule skinner led to the accidental shooting of the town dentist, brother to the sheriff.

Jake beats it to Lonesome Dove for the protection of his old friends. Lorena falls under the spell of the rogue, wounding the heart of a top cowhand named Dish Boggett who's in love with her, while Call is seduced by Jake's tales of pristine territory he's scouted in Montana, wide open to a ranching operation.

Receiving an order for forty horses from a cattleman driving his herd to Nebraska, the men cross into Mexico, where it's Call's mission to steal one hundred horses, buy some cattle and drive them to Montana to make their own fortune.

Their stolen ponies collide with a herd driven south by horse thieves, multiplying their holdings. Call begins hiring hands and convinces Gus--who realizes there won't be anyone left to talk to but the pigs--to come along on the journey.

Jake prefers a card game to work or to keeping his promise to take Lorena to San Francisco, but Gus convinces him to accompany her and them as far as Denver, knowing it would satisfy Lorena, entertain himself and infuriate Call.

Dangers on the trail include sand storms, stampedes, lightning strikes, nests of water moccasins in a swollen river and a barbarous Comanchero named Blue Duck, who abducts Lorena while Jake is off gambling.

Rescued by Gus, her recovery is complicated by the discovery that he intends to reunite with an old flame in Nebraska named Clara Allen, the love he never got over.

His hapless deputy Roscoe Brown goes after them once his boss's wife Elmira Boot Johnson promptly vanishes, headed for Nebraska with buffalo hunters to find her first husband.

The whiskey boat stank, and the men on it stank, but Elmira was not sorry she had taken the passage. She had a tiny little cubbyhole among the whiskey casks, with a few planks and some buffalo skins thrown over it to keep the rain out, but she spent most of her time sitting at the rear of the boat, watching the endless flow of brown water.

Some days were so hot that the air above the water shimmered and the shore become indistinct; others days a chill rain blew and she wrapped herself in one of the buffalo robes and kept fairly dry.

The rain was welcome, for it discouraged the fleas. They made her sleep uneasy, but it was a small price to pay for escaping from Fort Smith.

She had lived where there were fleas before, and worse things than fleas. McMurtry's indulgences with epic storytelling and the tendency of his minor characters to behave like idiots--their misplaced devotion leading them on foolhardy quests in pursuit of lovers who want nothing more of them--seem to go hand in hand.

I could have done without the July Johnson and Elmira Boot subplots. McMurtry's banter as instigated by Gus is often amusing, sometimes profound, but there's too much of it.

The overkill is balanced by the tremendous appeal of Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call, the archetypal visionary and practical man.

Their company is stocked with archetypes I recognized, co-workers who were far from Texas Rangers or even cowboys but exhibited many of the same qualities as Deets, Pea or Jake Spoon.

McMurtry's facility with dialogue, character and description all brought to bear on Lonesome Dove. In addition to his terrific banter-- where men debate whether it is pigs or horses who are smarter or work through the great mysteries of women or death--I liked how devoted McMurtry was to exploring the relationship between two men.

Like a marriage, Gus and Call love each other, but are getting fed up. I saw quite a bit of myself in the character of Woodrow Call, a gift for an author to pull off.

As antagonists go, Blue Duck has no equal. The period detail is spare but I felt I had an extremely clear proscenium on what the Old West was like as McMurtry took me through it.

The Streets of Laredo was envisioned as a deconstruction, with cowboys facing their mortality. Twelve years later, McMurtry bought the rights to his script treatment and developed Lonesome Dove.

View all 28 comments. Oct 25, Julie rated it it was amazing Shelves: , classics , western , historical-fiction , paperback.

A little background- I do not read westerns- with the occasional exception of western historical romances here and there over the years.

When it comes to movies or television shows- again, that would be a big, fat, no- except for the movie Tombstone. However, after reading a nonfictional book about Dodge City, I thought I might finally be ready to try a fictional western.

Overwhelmingly, my Goodreads friends recommended I read this book- and one wonderful friend gave me a special nudge to get started on it sooner, rather than later- and I really, really appreciated that!!

With the book weighing in at over nine-hundred pages, I thought I should wait for a time when I could read large portions of the book at a time and really digest it, because the praise heaped on this novel indicated it would demand my undivided attention.

As it turns out, life thew my family a few serious curveballs this past summer and I found myself struggling to keep up with everything, so I took a little sabbatical from social media, including Goodreads, and dove headlong into this unforgettable saga.

But I will say, these characters, the landscape and scenery, and dialogue held me in thrall. I eventually became numb to it, though.

The ending threw me a little at first, too. I rolled it around in my head for a while trying to make up my mind about it. It is also one of the reasons why, after having finished the book months ago, I am just now attempting to verbalize my feelings- going back over everything that led to this crossroads of life for Call- and wondering if I was taking from the novel all that was intended.

But, when you get right down to the nitty gritty, this novel has many of the elements I love in a good long saga that spans over a long period of time.

I love how the story takes readers on an adventure, giving the characters true tests of courage, and letting them develop in a way we don't see much of, these days.

Naturally, these characters will endure hardships and tragedy along the way- and the reader is right there in the thick of it, experiencing every emotion up close and personal.

Although I have read my fair share of long sagas, I have never experienced a book quite like this one. The writing is rich and vibrant, but with a raw grit to it, that occasionally caused me to pause for time, but despite the pain, and anger, and sadness- there are moments of lightness, humor and laughter, and a deep poignancy makes this a novel that sticks with you for the long haul.

I will never, ever forget these characters, or the incredible storytelling in this novel! View all 58 comments. Katy What a lovely review Julie!

So nice to be able to step out of your comfort zone and find it actually is quite comfortable! What a pleasant experience! Julie Katy wrote: "What a lovely review Julie!

What a pleasan Katy wrote: "What a lovely review Julie! I agree! I should probably step out of my comfort zone more often!

Feb 17, Paul Bryant rated it it was amazing Shelves: modern-western , novels. He never trips or stumbles. As you know this is the enormous story of a big old cattle drive from Texas to Montana.

Bits get added on here and there but the main idea is to get these thousands of cows across miles of dangerous territory, through sandstorms, blizzards, bandits, droughts, through Indian nations, across rivers, via grizzly bears and hardly a single town in sight the whole way.

If they needed lunch they shot it. There are a couple of things that might set modern readers on edge a bit.

Nearly all the female characters are or were whores their term. Gus shot a few. There is an awful lot of loping in this book.

Horses never canter or gallop or trot, they lope. Loping is also done by coyotes, wolves and men. There is one of the greatest ninja warrior manic dream pixie girls, a wild child called Janey.

You might not think, but it does. I got tired of listening. What do you say? He knows the cowboys would pull the tails. A little later the Company of the Ring is formed nine members.

In Lonesome Dove the two ex-Rangers put together a Company themselves for their epic task - seven members. All either good or great.

Then Clint Eastwood rescued the whole genre. Then Hollywood and tv mostly got tired of the Western. But now these modern writers have kicked the whole thing back into life.

View all 17 comments. Dec 13, Fabian rated it really liked it. I enjoy reading but McMurtry asks way too much. This epic tale spans thousands of miles from the Old West Texas to the as-of-yet-up-for-grabs land of Montana.

The best stuff here is the campfire philosophy of Gus, and his incredible relationship with the solemn Woodrow Call is the stuff that legend is made of.

The book refuses to end though, and despite the authenticity of this far away world it is the Lord of the Rings I enjoy reading but McMurtry asks way too much.

The book refuses to end though, and despite the authenticity of this far away world it is the Lord of the Rings of Western classics , I could not help but feel that the different story lines, of the outlaws, whores and fellow pioneers went nowhere.

A life lesson in everything? Would the plot have suffered if more chapters had been edited out? Perhaps the bigness is part of the whole Lonesome Dove Experience.

But sometimes I did want it to end I'll admit the cowboys sometimes more than overstayed their welcome. View all 8 comments.

My first time reading a Pulitzer winner and it is truly an epic story in every sense. A book that left me happy, sad, angry, and teary at times.

Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call are two retired rangers who run a cattle company in a small town called Lonesome Dove.

Whereas Augustus is very talkative Call is the opposite, talking only when it is necessary. An odd pair to be friends. Everything is going fine and suddenly out of nowhere an old friend, Jake Spoon, makes an appearance out of nowhere.

Jake Spoon by mistake has murdered a doctor in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is now wanted for same. How green it is and there is no one to claim it.

Call gets all anxious to be to first to claim it and soon he starts his journey from Texas to Montana with some cattle.

I absolutely love the characters in the book. McMurtry has done a wonderful job in carving them. He has paid an equal attention to primary and secondary characters telling us about their backgrounds and how it effects their present.

I laughed with them, I cried with them, felt their pain, indecisiveness, sometimes I hated them for their foolishness but in the end I loved them all.

Augustus McCrae, a non-stop talker, someone who can argue on a subject for countless hours. Fellow rangers worship him, though not for his talkativeness, but for he is a good man.

I came to love his truthfulness and boldness. He is blunt but also helpful. Someone who keep his promises and has a good heart. So a request to everyone who has this one on their tbr, please read it asap and if you don't have it on your tbr even then go ahead and read it for this is an awesome read.

View all 12 comments. Mar 04, Dan Schwent rated it it was amazing Shelves: kitten-squisher , pants-shittingly-awesome , western , man-tears , This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Retired Texas Rangers Woodrow F. Will they make it alive? When I was a lad, around the time the glaciers receded and civilization began, I was enthralled with a certain TV miniseries.

It was, in fact, Lonesome Dove. Though it took a couple decades, I finally made myself read the book the miniseries was based on and I've very glad I did.

Lonesome Dove is an epic set in the dying days of the Old West. On the surface, it's the story of two men entering old age and going on one last adventure.

Digging a little deeper, it's a story about friendship, loyalty, obsession, and carving out a new place for yourself in a world that's moved on without you.

The tale of a cattle drive across three thousand miles of prairie doesn't sound that interesting on the surface but McMurtry's tale is populated with a colorful cast of characters.

While being opposite in terms of personality, they both still have enough grit to be believable as former Texas Rangers and I have no trouble believing in their friendship.

The supporting cast also has its share of gems, like gambler and former Texas Ranger Jake Spoon, Arkansas sheriff July Johnson, former whore Lorena Wood, Gus's former love Clara, and Newt, the son of a dead whore whose father has yet to acknowledge him.

While the book has an epic scope, the shifting viewpoints and colorful characters make it very accessible and a quick read for a book of its size.

While I'd seen the miniseries a couple times, this book managed to wring a few man-tears out of me. Knowing the deaths were coming made it harder somehow.

I held out hope that a couple people would survive despite dying in the miniseries but it was not to be. The bottom line is that deep down, all men wish we had a friend that would haul our carcass from Montana to Texas if that was our dying request.

Five out of five stars. Go read the son of a bitch. Feb 10, Robin rated it really liked it Recommended to Robin by: Julie.

Shelves: pulitzer-prize-winner , buddy-read , , american. I've always had a soft spot for western movies. In high school, I roped my friends into watching the ones starring this guy: Later, I swooned over the epic starring this guy: Westerns haven't featured heavily in my reading life, but Cormac McCarthy sure got my attention last year with All the Pretty Horses and No Country for Old Men.

This one, written in , and winner of the Pulitzer prize, is about a million pages long. So you gotta love westerns if you're gonna love this.

Cowboys, guns, whores I've always had a soft spot for western movies. Cowboys, guns, whores, whiskey and plenty of adventure, much of it involving man vs.

If that ain't your bag, you've come to the wrong saloon. As I was saying, this book is a zillion pages long, and it takes about 17 million of them for the story to actually start.

So the beginning is painfully slow. Twenty six chapters go by before the characters pick up and leave Lonesome Dove for their grand undertaking - bringing their cattle to set up a ranch in Montana.

I struggled with the slow beginning, and was a little bit underwhelmed by the plain prose, until in section 3, when I came to a belated realisation of what I was actually reading: a STORY.

I know this sounds really stupid, like duh, what did I think I was reading? I guess the Pulitzer label and the 5-star constellations that abound for this book had me expecting something different.

No fancy writing, but an epic, all-American adventure, filled with characters who get under your skin in the most insidious manner. It sneaks up on you, but before you know it, you suffer when they suffer, your heart soars when they succeed, you understand and forgive when they fail.

This film actually a mini-series is an absolute masterpiece. It starts with the cinematography and locations. It was not your stereotypical Utah-canyon photography, it was the great plains, the Texas deserts, the wide rivers, the mesquite groves.

Not marvelous vistas, but simple, real, gritty scenery. You can taste the dust of the panhandle and smell the Kansas plains.

Then there's the action. There's lots of it. Flooding rivers, driving rains, realistic fights, thundering cattle drives, horrible scenes of rape and torture just under TV censor radar , plenty of death and sadness.

All of it believable. All of it heart-tugging. All of it amazing. But above all of these great features are the characters and the writing.

Augustus McCrae and Woodrow F. Call have become two icons of pop culture, polar opposites who work well together and, in the end, are incomplete without one another.

The supporting cast as well is fabulous, well written, patently interesting, and tremendously played. Even the evil characters are fascinating.

This is what television and film should be. It is very, very rare for anything of this quality to ever appear on the small screen, and with today's "reality TV" craze, it is even rarer still.

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Episode Guide. Two former Texas Rangers renew their spirit of adventure as they and several other residents of a small Texas town join a cattle drive to the Montana Territory.

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Call 4 episodes, Danny Glover Joshua Deets 4 episodes, Diane Lane Lorena Wood 4 episodes, Robert Urich Jake Spoon 4 episodes, Frederic Forrest Blue Duck 4 episodes, D.

Dish Boggett 4 episodes, Ricky Schroder Newt Dobbs 4 episodes, Anjelica Huston Clara Allen 4 episodes, Chris Cooper July Johnson 4 episodes, Timothy Scott Pea Eye Parker 4 episodes, Glenne Headly Elmira Boot Johnson 4 episodes, Barry Corbin Roscoe Brown 4 episodes, William Sanderson Lippy Jones 4 episodes, Barry Tubb Jasper Fant 4 episodes, Gavan O'Herlihy Dan Suggs 4 episodes, Steve Buscemi Luke 4 episodes, Frederick Coffin Big Zwey 4 episodes, Travis Swords Doctor 4 episodes, Ron Weyand Old Hugh 4 episodes, Lanny Flaherty Soupy Jones 4 episodes, David Carpenter Needle Nelson 4 episodes, James McMurtry Jimmy Rainey 4 episodes, Charlie Haynie Cowboy 4 episodes, Sonny Carl Davis Bolivar 3 episodes, Thomas Connor Bob Allen 2 episodes, Jerry Biggs Roy Suggs 2 episodes, Missy Crider Sally Allen 2 episodes, Sean Hennigan Eddie Suggs 2 episodes, Lauren Stanley Betsy Allen 2 episodes, Julius Tennon Frog Lip 2 episodes, Jack Caffrey

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There are nighttime raids into Mexico, and Indian fights, and outlaw gangs. On the trail, the men of the Hat Creek Cattle Company have to contend with ornery cattle, wild rivers, and sudden storms, not to mention a fearsome desperado named Blue Duck.

All that, however, is only incident to the central storyline: the platonic love story of two men. It is their co-dependent some would argue destructive relationship that drives the plot and gives Lonesome Dove its sometimes staggering power.

It is worth noting that McMurtry adapted the screenplay for Brokeback Mountain , a less platonic love story between two cowboys. When the novel opens, they are running a middling cattle company in the border town of Lonesome Dove, Texas.

We begin with Gus McCrae, making biscuits for breakfast: It was tribute enough to sunup that it could make even chaparral bushes look beautiful, Augustus thought, and he watched the process happily, knowing it would only last a few minutes.

The sun spread reddish-gold light through the shining bushes, among which a few goats wandered, bleating.

Even when the sun rose above the low bluffs to the south, a layer of light lingered for a bit at the level of the chaparral, as if independent of its source.

Then the sun lifted clear, like an immense coin. The dew quickly died, and the light that filled the bushes like red dust dispersed, leaving clear, slightly bluish air.

Which is an utterly classical way to open a novel. This is Jake Spoon, a garrulous, fun-loving man who likes to drink, gamble, and make love.

In tone, Lonesome Dove is elegiacal. It is set in the late s, sometime after the death of Custer, but before the final slaughter of Wounded Knee.

The west is still wild, but the writing is on the wall. Civilization will out. An end of an era is coming.

Augustus and Woodrow recognize this. They are aging themselves, and much of the time, McMurtry is taking his story in two directions.

While his characters physically move towards Montana, they are also traveling back in time, to the choices they made as younger versions of themselves.

Lonesome Dove is driven as much by character as plot. The plot itself is wide-ranging, with several disconnected storylines gradually merging into climatic moments.

Woodrow Call is the emotionally constipated leader, a hard, rigid man with a strict code of honor, who hates rude behavior and cannot tolerate weakness — especially his own.

The Hat Creek Cattle crew is also joined by a former piano player, a couple of stray Irishmen, and some intrepid pigs.

This is a masculine world, but there are a couple major female roles. The first belongs to Lorena, a prostitute in Lonesome Dove who accompanies the cattle drive to Montana.

At first blush, she seems a tired type, the whore with a heart of gold. She does not always have control of events, yet she maintains her agency.

She knows what she wants and does not want and acts accordingly. She is a character worthy of Gus in every way, and is one of the few people who can steal a scene back from him.

She is blunt and brash and caught in the tangled webs of the past, like everyone else. Her native sense makes her a bit of a Greek chorus, commenting on Gus and Woodrow and the consequences of their relationship.

The amazing thing about all these characters, even the walk-ons, is that they feel real. They have depth.

They do not always make the right choices. They do not always do the right things. They can be stubborn. They can be prickly.

They are not always likeable. Frequently, they can be downright frustrating. There are exceptions. Some of the characters are absurdities, because McMurtry has a bit of an eye for oddballs.

Towering over them all is Augustus McCrae. He is, I am confident in saying, one of the best characters in the history of American letters.

He is a raconteur, the man who always has something to say about everything. He is both hard-bitten and starry-eyed; a pragmatist and a romantic. And he is filled with wisdom.

The healthy way is to learn to like the everyday things, like soft beds and buttermilk—and feisty gentlemen. None of us is such fine judges of what to do.

A man that likes to rent pigs won't be stopped. Nevertheless, they have real affection for each other, even though, as Clara notes, they might have been better off missing each other completely.

Lonesome Dove perfectly balances its tone. It is, at times, a realistic western with a mythical overlay. In other moments, though, it is pure myth, proudly brimming with archetypal tropes.

The world of Lonesome Dove can be violent and grim and dark. It can be nostalgic. It can be funny and sly. It can be farcical.

It can be plaintive and mournful. There is a hint or two of magical realism. As with many of the great epics, it refuses to be pegged as one thing; instead, it is all these things, like the world is all these things.

My paperback version is nearly pages long, and with that kind of heft, you might expect McMurtry to say something profound about the complex arc of our national history.

Instead, he centers his insights on people. Specifically, we are here to learn how to live from Augustus McCrae. View all 14 comments.

My introduction to the fiction of Larry McMurtry is Lonesome Dove , consistently ranked as one of the best westerns whether the conversation is print or television.

Published the year of the Texas Sesquicentennial in and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction the following year, the magnum opus is a magnificent exploration of male friendship, with a dozen supporting characters of both genders who McMurtry could've dedicated a novella to and often attempts to over pages.

The bantering My introduction to the fiction of Larry McMurtry is Lonesome Dove , consistently ranked as one of the best westerns whether the conversation is print or television.

The bantering becomes a beast of its own and the story padding crosses over into self-indulgence, but there's no question that there's a masterful novel in here.

Somewhere along the border of Texas and Mexico in the late s lies the town of Lonesome Dove, which consists of little more than a dry saloon and a livery stable.

A two-time widower and a bachelor, respectively, the men lead Joshua Deets a black scout from their rangering days , Peaeye Parker an ex-ranger who is loyal but none too bright , Newt Dobbs the seventeen year old progeny of a prostitute and in all likelihood, Call and Bolivar an ill-tempered cook who enjoys clanging the dinner bell with a crowbar.

Having dedicated their prime to eliminating the threat of Comanche Indians or Mexican bandits to Texas, Gus and Call have spent nine years operating the Hat Creek Cattle Company, stabling horses, stealing fresh ones south of the border for sale and little else.

When he's not drinking whiskey on the porch or jawing, Augustus visits the Dry Bean for a card game or a poke with the town's sporting lady, a cool blonde named Lorena Wood who dreams of traveling to San Francisco, but needs a dependable man to get her there.

Call, whose favorite pastime is sitting at the river crossing after dinner hoping he might catch a horse thief, hungers for a challenge.

Call was not a man to daydream--that was Gus's department--but then it wasn't really daydreaming he did, alone on the little bluff at night. It was just thinking back to the years when a man who presumed to stake out a Comanche trail would do well to keep his rifle cocked.

Yet the fact that he had taken to thinking back annoyed him, too: he didn't want to start working over his memories, like an old man. Sometimes he would force himself to get up and walk two or three more miles up the river and back, just to get the memories out of his head.

Not until he felt alert again--felt that he could still captain if the need arose--would he return to Lonesome Dove. The next morning, Deets returns from San Antonio with Jake Spoon, a comrade from their rangering days whose love for ladies and aversion to work has led him to a career as a gambler.

Jake had overstayed his welcome in Fort Smith, Arkansas when an argument with a mule skinner led to the accidental shooting of the town dentist, brother to the sheriff.

Jake beats it to Lonesome Dove for the protection of his old friends. Lorena falls under the spell of the rogue, wounding the heart of a top cowhand named Dish Boggett who's in love with her, while Call is seduced by Jake's tales of pristine territory he's scouted in Montana, wide open to a ranching operation.

Receiving an order for forty horses from a cattleman driving his herd to Nebraska, the men cross into Mexico, where it's Call's mission to steal one hundred horses, buy some cattle and drive them to Montana to make their own fortune.

Their stolen ponies collide with a herd driven south by horse thieves, multiplying their holdings. Call begins hiring hands and convinces Gus--who realizes there won't be anyone left to talk to but the pigs--to come along on the journey.

Jake prefers a card game to work or to keeping his promise to take Lorena to San Francisco, but Gus convinces him to accompany her and them as far as Denver, knowing it would satisfy Lorena, entertain himself and infuriate Call.

Dangers on the trail include sand storms, stampedes, lightning strikes, nests of water moccasins in a swollen river and a barbarous Comanchero named Blue Duck, who abducts Lorena while Jake is off gambling.

Rescued by Gus, her recovery is complicated by the discovery that he intends to reunite with an old flame in Nebraska named Clara Allen, the love he never got over.

His hapless deputy Roscoe Brown goes after them once his boss's wife Elmira Boot Johnson promptly vanishes, headed for Nebraska with buffalo hunters to find her first husband.

The whiskey boat stank, and the men on it stank, but Elmira was not sorry she had taken the passage. She had a tiny little cubbyhole among the whiskey casks, with a few planks and some buffalo skins thrown over it to keep the rain out, but she spent most of her time sitting at the rear of the boat, watching the endless flow of brown water.

Some days were so hot that the air above the water shimmered and the shore become indistinct; others days a chill rain blew and she wrapped herself in one of the buffalo robes and kept fairly dry.

The rain was welcome, for it discouraged the fleas. They made her sleep uneasy, but it was a small price to pay for escaping from Fort Smith.

She had lived where there were fleas before, and worse things than fleas. McMurtry's indulgences with epic storytelling and the tendency of his minor characters to behave like idiots--their misplaced devotion leading them on foolhardy quests in pursuit of lovers who want nothing more of them--seem to go hand in hand.

I could have done without the July Johnson and Elmira Boot subplots. McMurtry's banter as instigated by Gus is often amusing, sometimes profound, but there's too much of it.

The overkill is balanced by the tremendous appeal of Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call, the archetypal visionary and practical man.

Their company is stocked with archetypes I recognized, co-workers who were far from Texas Rangers or even cowboys but exhibited many of the same qualities as Deets, Pea or Jake Spoon.

McMurtry's facility with dialogue, character and description all brought to bear on Lonesome Dove. In addition to his terrific banter-- where men debate whether it is pigs or horses who are smarter or work through the great mysteries of women or death--I liked how devoted McMurtry was to exploring the relationship between two men.

Like a marriage, Gus and Call love each other, but are getting fed up. I saw quite a bit of myself in the character of Woodrow Call, a gift for an author to pull off.

As antagonists go, Blue Duck has no equal. The period detail is spare but I felt I had an extremely clear proscenium on what the Old West was like as McMurtry took me through it.

The Streets of Laredo was envisioned as a deconstruction, with cowboys facing their mortality. Twelve years later, McMurtry bought the rights to his script treatment and developed Lonesome Dove.

View all 28 comments. Oct 25, Julie rated it it was amazing Shelves: , classics , western , historical-fiction , paperback. A little background- I do not read westerns- with the occasional exception of western historical romances here and there over the years.

When it comes to movies or television shows- again, that would be a big, fat, no- except for the movie Tombstone. However, after reading a nonfictional book about Dodge City, I thought I might finally be ready to try a fictional western.

Overwhelmingly, my Goodreads friends recommended I read this book- and one wonderful friend gave me a special nudge to get started on it sooner, rather than later- and I really, really appreciated that!!

With the book weighing in at over nine-hundred pages, I thought I should wait for a time when I could read large portions of the book at a time and really digest it, because the praise heaped on this novel indicated it would demand my undivided attention.

As it turns out, life thew my family a few serious curveballs this past summer and I found myself struggling to keep up with everything, so I took a little sabbatical from social media, including Goodreads, and dove headlong into this unforgettable saga.

But I will say, these characters, the landscape and scenery, and dialogue held me in thrall. I eventually became numb to it, though.

The ending threw me a little at first, too. I rolled it around in my head for a while trying to make up my mind about it. It is also one of the reasons why, after having finished the book months ago, I am just now attempting to verbalize my feelings- going back over everything that led to this crossroads of life for Call- and wondering if I was taking from the novel all that was intended.

But, when you get right down to the nitty gritty, this novel has many of the elements I love in a good long saga that spans over a long period of time.

I love how the story takes readers on an adventure, giving the characters true tests of courage, and letting them develop in a way we don't see much of, these days.

Naturally, these characters will endure hardships and tragedy along the way- and the reader is right there in the thick of it, experiencing every emotion up close and personal.

Although I have read my fair share of long sagas, I have never experienced a book quite like this one. The writing is rich and vibrant, but with a raw grit to it, that occasionally caused me to pause for time, but despite the pain, and anger, and sadness- there are moments of lightness, humor and laughter, and a deep poignancy makes this a novel that sticks with you for the long haul.

I will never, ever forget these characters, or the incredible storytelling in this novel! View all 58 comments.

Katy What a lovely review Julie! So nice to be able to step out of your comfort zone and find it actually is quite comfortable!

What a pleasant experience! Julie Katy wrote: "What a lovely review Julie! What a pleasan Katy wrote: "What a lovely review Julie!

I agree! I should probably step out of my comfort zone more often! Feb 17, Paul Bryant rated it it was amazing Shelves: modern-western , novels.

He never trips or stumbles. As you know this is the enormous story of a big old cattle drive from Texas to Montana. Bits get added on here and there but the main idea is to get these thousands of cows across miles of dangerous territory, through sandstorms, blizzards, bandits, droughts, through Indian nations, across rivers, via grizzly bears and hardly a single town in sight the whole way.

If they needed lunch they shot it. There are a couple of things that might set modern readers on edge a bit. Nearly all the female characters are or were whores their term.

Gus shot a few. There is an awful lot of loping in this book. Horses never canter or gallop or trot, they lope. Loping is also done by coyotes, wolves and men.

There is one of the greatest ninja warrior manic dream pixie girls, a wild child called Janey. You might not think, but it does.

I got tired of listening. What do you say? He knows the cowboys would pull the tails. A little later the Company of the Ring is formed nine members.

In Lonesome Dove the two ex-Rangers put together a Company themselves for their epic task - seven members.

All either good or great. Then Clint Eastwood rescued the whole genre. Then Hollywood and tv mostly got tired of the Western. But now these modern writers have kicked the whole thing back into life.

View all 17 comments. Dec 13, Fabian rated it really liked it. I enjoy reading but McMurtry asks way too much.

This epic tale spans thousands of miles from the Old West Texas to the as-of-yet-up-for-grabs land of Montana. The best stuff here is the campfire philosophy of Gus, and his incredible relationship with the solemn Woodrow Call is the stuff that legend is made of.

The book refuses to end though, and despite the authenticity of this far away world it is the Lord of the Rings I enjoy reading but McMurtry asks way too much.

The book refuses to end though, and despite the authenticity of this far away world it is the Lord of the Rings of Western classics , I could not help but feel that the different story lines, of the outlaws, whores and fellow pioneers went nowhere.

A life lesson in everything? Would the plot have suffered if more chapters had been edited out? Perhaps the bigness is part of the whole Lonesome Dove Experience.

But sometimes I did want it to end I'll admit the cowboys sometimes more than overstayed their welcome. View all 8 comments. My first time reading a Pulitzer winner and it is truly an epic story in every sense.

A book that left me happy, sad, angry, and teary at times. Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call are two retired rangers who run a cattle company in a small town called Lonesome Dove.

Whereas Augustus is very talkative Call is the opposite, talking only when it is necessary. An odd pair to be friends.

Everything is going fine and suddenly out of nowhere an old friend, Jake Spoon, makes an appearance out of nowhere.

Jake Spoon by mistake has murdered a doctor in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is now wanted for same. How green it is and there is no one to claim it.

Call gets all anxious to be to first to claim it and soon he starts his journey from Texas to Montana with some cattle. I absolutely love the characters in the book.

McMurtry has done a wonderful job in carving them. He has paid an equal attention to primary and secondary characters telling us about their backgrounds and how it effects their present.

I laughed with them, I cried with them, felt their pain, indecisiveness, sometimes I hated them for their foolishness but in the end I loved them all.

Augustus McCrae, a non-stop talker, someone who can argue on a subject for countless hours. Fellow rangers worship him, though not for his talkativeness, but for he is a good man.

I came to love his truthfulness and boldness. He is blunt but also helpful. Someone who keep his promises and has a good heart.

So a request to everyone who has this one on their tbr, please read it asap and if you don't have it on your tbr even then go ahead and read it for this is an awesome read.

View all 12 comments. Mar 04, Dan Schwent rated it it was amazing Shelves: kitten-squisher , pants-shittingly-awesome , western , man-tears , This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Retired Texas Rangers Woodrow F. Will they make it alive? When I was a lad, around the time the glaciers receded and civilization began, I was enthralled with a certain TV miniseries.

It was, in fact, Lonesome Dove. Though it took a couple decades, I finally made myself read the book the miniseries was based on and I've very glad I did.

Lonesome Dove is an epic set in the dying days of the Old West. On the surface, it's the story of two men entering old age and going on one last adventure.

Digging a little deeper, it's a story about friendship, loyalty, obsession, and carving out a new place for yourself in a world that's moved on without you.

The tale of a cattle drive across three thousand miles of prairie doesn't sound that interesting on the surface but McMurtry's tale is populated with a colorful cast of characters.

While being opposite in terms of personality, they both still have enough grit to be believable as former Texas Rangers and I have no trouble believing in their friendship.

The supporting cast also has its share of gems, like gambler and former Texas Ranger Jake Spoon, Arkansas sheriff July Johnson, former whore Lorena Wood, Gus's former love Clara, and Newt, the son of a dead whore whose father has yet to acknowledge him.

While the book has an epic scope, the shifting viewpoints and colorful characters make it very accessible and a quick read for a book of its size.

While I'd seen the miniseries a couple times, this book managed to wring a few man-tears out of me. Knowing the deaths were coming made it harder somehow.

I held out hope that a couple people would survive despite dying in the miniseries but it was not to be. The bottom line is that deep down, all men wish we had a friend that would haul our carcass from Montana to Texas if that was our dying request.

Five out of five stars. Go read the son of a bitch. Feb 10, Robin rated it really liked it Recommended to Robin by: Julie. Shelves: pulitzer-prize-winner , buddy-read , , american.

I've always had a soft spot for western movies. In high school, I roped my friends into watching the ones starring this guy: Later, I swooned over the epic starring this guy: Westerns haven't featured heavily in my reading life, but Cormac McCarthy sure got my attention last year with All the Pretty Horses and No Country for Old Men.

This one, written in , and winner of the Pulitzer prize, is about a million pages long. So you gotta love westerns if you're gonna love this.

Cowboys, guns, whores I've always had a soft spot for western movies. Cowboys, guns, whores, whiskey and plenty of adventure, much of it involving man vs.

If that ain't your bag, you've come to the wrong saloon. As I was saying, this book is a zillion pages long, and it takes about 17 million of them for the story to actually start.

So the beginning is painfully slow. Twenty six chapters go by before the characters pick up and leave Lonesome Dove for their grand undertaking - bringing their cattle to set up a ranch in Montana.

I struggled with the slow beginning, and was a little bit underwhelmed by the plain prose, until in section 3, when I came to a belated realisation of what I was actually reading: a STORY.

I know this sounds really stupid, like duh, what did I think I was reading? I guess the Pulitzer label and the 5-star constellations that abound for this book had me expecting something different.

No fancy writing, but an epic, all-American adventure, filled with characters who get under your skin in the most insidious manner.

It sneaks up on you, but before you know it, you suffer when they suffer, your heart soars when they succeed, you understand and forgive when they fail.

And you wish you had about an ounce of their grit - because these men and women are all tougher in their sleep than I could ever be on my toughest day.

I think I still prefer McCarthy's style though McMurtry gets just as dark and violent , because of the poetic depth in his writing, plus he gets there in far less pages.

But I tip my hat to Larry McMurtry - what an accomplishment! Yee haw!! View all 68 comments. Nov 03, Dem rated it it was amazing Shelves: prize-winner , 5-star , favorites , recommended , adventure.

What a phenomenal read, enormous and brilliant, witty and heartbreaking, a mamoth tale that touches the reader's emotions on so many levels. This is a book that honestly did not appeal to me in the slightest but pages in I was hooked, invested, facinated and brought back in time to the Wild West of the s and the adventures of a bunch of unforgettable and unique characters.

I can definatley see why this is a Pulitzer Prize Winner. The story focuses on a the relationship amount a bunch of What a phenomenal read, enormous and brilliant, witty and heartbreaking, a mamoth tale that touches the reader's emotions on so many levels.

The story focuses on a the relationship amount a bunch of Texas Rangers and takes the reader on an epic cattle drive from The Rio Grande to the highlands of Montana in the closing years of the Wild West days, A triumphant portrayal of the American West as it really was.

I came across this book on a " What Should I read next" Podcast by Anne Bogel, It was reviewed on several of her shows as one of those books you just have to read.

When I realised that the novel was close to pages and was a Western I put it on the top shelf and decided it could not possibly be worth the time and commitment.

However January can be a long month and when my husband was looking for a good book to read and something that would hold his interest I reached for Lomesome Dove and we decided it was to become our January reading challenge and what a remarkable surprise this book turned out to be for both of us.

Western Novels are totally out of my confort zone however I do like a challenge and this book reminded me of The Pillars of the Earth in the sense that it is an epic monumental novel, with a wonderful sense of time and place, the most amazing and extremely well formed characters that you grow to love and root for and a book that suprises the reader in so many ways.

The prose is simple yet effective, the descriptions of the countryside and are vivid and transporting, uplifting and inspiring. This is a story of heroism, love, honour, loyalty and betrayal.

I gave this one 5 stars because it, educated me, made me laugh out loud, made me fall head over heels in love with Agustas McCrae and I couldn't wait to come home from work every evening to spend time with the boys and gals from Lonesome Dove.

I think there should be a list on goodreads for Books that you would never dream of reading but will end up absolutely loving I read this in paperback and also purchased an audio copy as well and I can highly recommend the audio as very well paced and narrated.

View all 51 comments. Sep 07, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: 20th-century , historical , classics , adventure , epic , fiction , love-strories.

Gus and his pig were aggravating company. When I finished this, yesterday evening, I was filled by a tremendous sense of melancholy, not just because the book was finally finished, but because of its introspective nature.

Hysterically funny the one moment, heartbreakingly tragic the next, it alternately delighted and depressed me to an extent I hav Gus and his pig were aggravating company.

Hysterically funny the one moment, heartbreakingly tragic the next, it alternately delighted and depressed me to an extent I have seldom experienced before in so far as literary fiction is concerned.

It is also one of the most complete novels I have ever read, and you have to read it cover to cover before fully appreciating its power. They were on a plain of grass so huge that it was hard to imagine there was a world beyond it.

The herd, and themselves, were like a dot, surrounded by endless grass. Lonesome Dove is an occasionally hilarious, occasionally bleak glimpse at frontier life and frontier justice , and it may not be what you expected.

You will come away from this one deeply affected, for better or worse. It will also make you think. Inept deputy sheriff Roscoe Brown is sent after July to inform him of her disappearance, and has many misadventures and strange encounters through Arkansas and Texas, assisted by a young girl named Janey, who escapes from sexual slavery to accompany him.

Roscoe eventually reunites with July and Joe when they rescue him and Janey from bandits in Texas. As the cattle drive moves north through Texas, Jake tires of Lorena and abandons her to go gambling in Austin.

Left alone, she is abducted by an Indian bandit named Blue Duck, an old nemesis of the Texas Rangers. Gus goes in pursuit, and while traveling along the Canadian River he encounters July's group.

Gus and July attack Blue Duck's bandit encampment, killing the bandits and rescuing Lorena; however, Blue Duck has already made his escape, having murdered Roscoe, Joe, and Janey in the process.

A devastated July continues his journey in search of Elmira, while Gus and Lorena return to the cattle drive.

Lorena has been repeatedly raped and, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder , is frightened of interacting with anybody other than Gus.

The two of them, still following the cattle drive north, sleep in a tent some distance behind the other cowboys.

Meanwhile, Jake Spoon is in Fort Worth. Hearing that July Johnson has been looking for him, Jake leaves Texas in a hurry in the company of the Suggs brothers, whom he soon realizes are bandits.

Jake becomes increasingly alarmed by the brothers' actions as they travel north into Kansas; the gang progresses from robbery to outright murder, but Jake is too frightened and outnumbered to either kill them or escape.

When the gang attacks a trail boss known to Gus and Call, the former Rangers of the Hat Creek outfit go in pursuit of them.

The ex-Rangers are dismayed when they apprehend the Suggs brothers and find Jake alongside them. Jake pleads with his former comrades that he had no choice but to go along with things for fear of his own life, but Gus and Call stand firm that he has "crossed a line," and they solemnly hang him alongside the Suggs brothers.

Newt, who had idolized Jake as a child, is left deeply upset. Meanwhile, Elmira, pregnant with July's child, has come into the company of a rough buffalo hunter named Zwey, a simple man who seems to believe he is now "married" to her.

Arriving in Nebraska they come across the horse ranch of Clara Allen, Gus's former love, whose husband Bob has become a brain-damaged invalid after being kicked by a mustang.

Clara delivers Elmira's baby son, but Elmira and Zwey leave almost immediately afterwards for Ogallala. Dee Boot is held in the Ogallala jail, scheduled to be hanged for his accidental murder of a young boy; Elmira collapses while speaking to him, and Boot is hanged while she recuperates in a doctor's house, leaving her heartbroken and depressed.

July arrives at Clara's ranch, learns what has transpired, and goes to see her, but Elmira refuses to speak to him. Shortly afterwards she orders Zwey to take her east, back towards St.

July feels compelled to follow her, but at Clara's insistence he remains at the ranch with her family and his son instead, who Clara had named Martin, anguished and heartbroken.

Word later reaches them that Elmira and Zwey were killed by Sioux. She is happy to see him but has no desire to rekindle their romance; however, she takes in Lorena, whose post-traumatic stress is easing and who feels comfortable with Clara and her daughters.

Gus, rebuffed by Clara and no longer Lorena's sole carer, decides to go with the cattle drive and see the journey to Montana through to its end. In Wyoming , several horses are stolen by half-starved Indians.

Call, Gus, and Deets chase after them, and Deets is killed in the ensuing confrontation by the group's only remaining brave.

Shortly afterwards Gus informs Newt that Call is his father, something Newt has always dreamed of, but he is too upset by Deets' death to give it much thought.

The cattle drive arrives in Montana, which is as lush and beautiful as Jake had described. Scouting ahead of the main herd, Gus and Pea Eye are attacked by Blood Indians , and Gus is badly wounded by two arrows to the leg.

Besieged in a makeshift dugout in the bank of the Musselshell River for several days, Gus' wounds become infected, and his health declines.

After a heavy rain he sends Pea Eye down the swollen river to seek help, but Pea Eye loses his clothing, boots, gun and food in the river and stumbles naked, and unarmed with no food for a mile walk across the plains.

Starving, delirious and suffering from exposure, he returns to the main herd on the verge of death. Call then sets out alone to rescue Gus.

Meanwhile, Gus leaves the river shortly after Pea Eye, feverish and dying, taking his chances and escaping the Indians.

He makes it to Miles City, Montana , and collapses unconscious, waking to find that a doctor has sawed off his gangrenous leg.

His other leg is also infected, but Gus refuses to let the doctor amputate it. Ion Television has shown a digitally remastered version of the miniseries starting the weekend of June 30, during the "RHI Movie Weekend".

Sonar Entertainment is the current owner of the Lonesome Dove miniseries. Lonesome Dove received an overwhelmingly positive reception with critics and audience alike.

The New York Times commented that:. This six-hour miniseries, based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Larry McMurtry, revitalized both the miniseries and Western genres, both of which had been considered dead for several years Lonesome Dove earned 18 Emmy nominations and inspired a pair of miniseries sequel as well as two attempts at an ongoing television series.

The first installment on February 5, led the Nielsen ratings for the week, with an impressive Lonesome Dove was nominated for 18 Emmy Awards , winning seven.

It received the D. In Cabin Fever Music released an album of selections from his score; Sonic Images issued an expansion in , with cues premiered on the album listed below in bold.

Lonesome Dove was filmed in a soft matte 1. It was then released on Blu-ray Disc on August 5, just months before the film's 20th anniversary. The rights to Lonesome Dove on home video have varied for over two decades.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Motown Productions Pangaea Qintex Entertainment [1]. Los Angeles Times.

Retrieved January 3, May 1, Archived from the original on November 28, Retrieved The New York Times. Retrieved 31 March Fresh Air.

Retrieved August 2, Archived from the original on November 10, Retrieved September 8, Nielsen ratings , San Bernardino Sun , p. Retrieved 16 August Archived from the original on CS1 maint: archived copy as title link.

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Steele, Michael J. Beith Jr. Tinsley, Karla Caldwell, George B. Bell, and G. Donald F. Johnson sound mixer , James L. Cary White production designer and Michael J.

Sullivan set decorator For Part 4 "The Return".

Translations in context of "Lonesome dove" in English-German from Reverso Context: Lonesome Dove Country is of younger time in earth history. Lonesome Dove Knoxville, Knoxville. Gefällt Mal. Lonesome Dove Knoxville is Chef Tim Love's flagship, brought to life in Old City with added local. Amazon Music Stream millions of songs. Beide werden von einem Indianer namens Blue Duck ermordet. Back to top. Sie betreiben einen Pferdeverleih und Pferdehandel Intelligence Serie langweilen sich. Der Roman endet damit, dass Jessika Ginkel Call erzählt, warum es den Saloon nicht mehr gibt. Sold by. Dish hält sich länger, als er eigentlich vorhatte, in Lonesome Dove auf, weil er sich in Lorena verliebt hat, die auch von Newt heimlich verehrt wird. Dabei war er selbst ums Leben gekommen. Top reviews from the United States. Der umfangreiche Roman Seiten in der Goldmann Taschenbuchausgabe entwickelt im Stil eines Liebes- und Abenteuerromans ein breit angelegtes Bild des amerikanischen Westens in der zweiten Hälfte des Amazon Rapids Fun stories for kids on the go. Man muss sie gesehen haben! Gus wird jedoch auf einem Erkundungsritt bei einem Indianerangriff so schwer verletzt, dass er trotz Amputation eines Beines stirbt. July kommt auf dem Weg nach Ogallala ebenfalls an Claras Farm vorbei und erfährt, dass Elmira ebenfalls hier war und dass das Kind von ihm Gargoyles Serie. Lonesome Dove " zu sein. Aufgestapelt warten die 6 Segmente auf die weitere Ausarbeitung und Vervollständigung. Lonesome Dove McMurty manages to walk on the delicate line which divides the romantic from the ridiculous: The West is full of dirt and scorching Olympia 2019 Tv, and the work unpleasant and pays low; the civilization is still in its infancy, its cities and megacities are a vision of the distant future. Arriving in Nebraska they come across the horse ranch of Clara Allen, Gus's former love, whose husband Bob has become a brain-damaged invalid after being kicked by a mustang. The war also had a tremendous psychological effects on both nations - Lonesome Dove U. Call, whose favorite pastime is sitting at the river crossing after dinner hoping he might catch a horse thief, hungers for a challenge. Jimmy Rainey 4 episodes, Sullivan set decorator For Part 4 "The Return". Lonesome Dove is epic in the Supernatural Tod exalted sense of the term. Full Cast and Crew. It is, Serien Stream To Riverdale times, a realistic western with a mythical overlay. A large percentage of it covered the drive, with perils abounding.

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